Republicans PANICKING After Federal Judge Shuts Down Florida Voter Suppression

The Trump campaign is self destructing. If things get any worse between now and the election day, Trump could even be bringing down Congress. Republicans are in a panic and the only way out they see is voter suppression.

Florida’s Governor Rick Scott saw an opportunity when Hurricane Matthew hit. He refused to extend the registration deadline past 5:00 on Monday (seriously, why would the cutoff be a month before the election anyway?). A federal judge put a quick stop to that, calling it “irrational.” The deadline is extended till Tuesday.

“Quite simply, it is wholly irrational in this instance for Florida to refuse to extend the voter registration deadline when the state already allows the governor to suspend or move the election date due to an unforeseen emergency,” (U.S. District Judge Mark) Walker wrote in a 16-page order. “If aspiring eligible Florida voters are barred from registering to vote, then those voters are stripped of one of our most precious freedoms.”

Source: TampaBay.com

More than that, Walker called the state’s effort to block the vote “unconstitutional.”

“The right to vote is a ‘precious’ and ‘fundamental’ right,” Walker wrote, quoting from an earlier case.

It’s expected that about 100,000 additional people will be registering between now and the deadline. This is especially bad for Republicans. Clinton is leading the race in Florida by a narrow three points, but between his offensive remarks toward women and the fact that it was revealed that Trump illegally did business with Cuba, his Florida support is quickly fading. Without Florida, Trump is almost assured of losing, while Clinton could still win the election while losing Florida. Those 100,000 people might represent about one percent of the Florida electorate, which might not sound like a lot, but in a race that’s that close, in a perennial swing state, that could mean the difference between winning and losing.


Featured image via Joe Readle/Getty Images.