This Map Shows Every Pipeline Spill In The U.S. For The Past 28 Years (VIDEO)

The media tends to completely fail when it comes to reporting on pipeline ruptures. The tendency in the media is to report on pipeline ruptures as single incidents, when in reality they are a part of a larger problem of energy transportation companies’ crumbling infrastructure. There are a couple of great maps that have been created by The Center for Biological Diversity that show the reality of public crisis that is going on.

The Center for Biological Diversity reports:

“This time-lapse video shows pipeline incidents from 1986 to 2013, relying on publicly available data from the federal Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration. Only incidents classified as “significant” by the agency are shown in the video. “Significant” incidents include those in which someone was hospitalized or killed, damages amounted to more than $50,000, more than 5 barrels of highly volatile substances or 50 barrels of other liquid were released, or where the liquid exploded or burned.

According to the data, since 1986 there have been nearly 8,000 incidents (nearly 300 per year on average), resulting in more than 500 deaths (red dots on the video), more than 2,300 injuries (yellow dots on the video), and nearly $7 billion in damage.

Since 1986 pipeline accidents have spilled an average of 76,000 barrels per year or more than 3 million gallons. This is equivalent to 200 barrels every day.”

Here is the video:

So why are there more oil and gas spills occurring across the United States? Part of the problem, is the age of the pipelines. There are more than four million pipelines running across the United States, and many of them are in bad shape. Corporations don’t have much of an incentive to keep their pipelines maintained. They usually bet that the fines from the spills would be less of a financial burden than keeping up maintenance on their pipelines.

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We need to work together in the United States to shift to a fossil fuel free economy. Our planet and our society cannot continue on the way that it is. The recent spill in Santa Barbara has received a tremendous amount of news coverage, due to its size and historical reasons but it just one spill out of the hundreds that happen every year.

Bonus: This video shows every major pipeline spill in California.

Featured image Credit: Screenshot via YouTube.